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Tomas Gallucci

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The Art of Writing [Nov. 1st, 2007|09:30 pm]
Tomas Gallucci
[Tags|, , , , , , ]
[mood |contemplativecontemplative]
[music |The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford]



First of all, I think that writing is not only an art unto itself, it is also an art form. By this, I mean that for all the great writing that has occurred through the ages, there is a lot to be said about how that writing got on the page. Stephen King wrote a great book about writing called On Writing. In that book, he talked a lot about how he works. If memory serves me correctly, he said that he works a at wooden desk by himself, alone, quiet. The picture I have in my mind's eye is a heightened-reality cartoon of the Old West-- something very rustic and plain.

I think of the caricatures of famous people from the nineteenth century that are passed off as sophisticated. While mostly stuffy, one image that comes back to me over and over is Dickens sitting at his desk writing. There is a craft to the craft, and doesn't that appropriate? Each in his/her own way, writers of great fiction are the Romantics of the Romantics whether they realize it or not. If it wasn't for them, we wouldn't have the stories that we have today. Those people who tinkered in their own worlds inside their heads until the finally got on paper what we have come to know and discover, love and hate, respect and despise.

The only way to fight an idea is with another idea we're told. That's what these writers do. The give us ideas. They wage wars on the scale of WW II.

I talk about writers so because I like to think of myself in that group. I have no delusions of becoming one of the greats; I am what I am and I do what I do. If one day it's written that I join the ranks of the greats, then that's what's written. I have stories that I want to tell. Most of the films I want to make are of other people's books, other people's ideas. It's difficult for me to create at this point. Maybe I don't have enough life experiences to write novels; maybe I'm too impatient. Whatever the case, I have Final Draft and Open Office and a new Apple keyboard with my iTunes database to keep me company as I sit here at my desk. Hopefully sometime in the not so distant future there will be a Mac Book Pro in my future; we shall have to see.

Wish me well. Like Bill Monahan, I too wish to be on the red carpet for having a well written and superbly told story.
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Comments:
[User Picture]From: ehowton
2007-11-02 05:16 am (UTC)
So instead of taking a cue from the greats, you're going to surround yourself with music and scenery?

I think you're missing their point.
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[User Picture]From: schpydurx
2007-11-02 01:14 pm (UTC)
I knew I didn't write this as well as I had hoped. I guess what I meant was, I have (and for that matter had, but I now have better) tools with which to do the job in a streamlined process. Now that I've matured just a little, let's see if I make the time to make something out of myself.
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[User Picture]From: ehowton
2007-11-02 01:43 pm (UTC)
If you can't compose your thoughts and write on an XP box, you're not going to be able to compose your thoughts and write on a mac. That's not their function.
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[User Picture]From: schpydurx
2007-11-02 01:46 pm (UTC)
no, but maybe a change of scenery and workflow might. If nothing else, it's worth attempting to turn over a new leaf.
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[User Picture]From: ehowton
2007-11-02 02:19 pm (UTC)
I thought you tried that once to no success?
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[User Picture]From: schpydurx
2007-11-03 06:11 am (UTC)
If at first you don't succeed, try and try again.
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[User Picture]From: schpydurx
2007-11-02 01:15 pm (UTC)
Are you saying that I should have a blank desk with no music and scenery?
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[User Picture]From: ehowton
2007-11-02 01:44 pm (UTC)
I'm saying that was an interesting conclusion to your story.
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[User Picture]From: schpydurx
2007-11-02 01:51 pm (UTC)
I agree. It is an interesting conclusion...which begs the question: what percentage of the time would you say you are listening to some form of music when you are authoring your posts?
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[User Picture]From: ehowton
2007-11-02 02:15 pm (UTC)
You show how the greats worked:

...he works a at wooden desk by himself, alone, quiet.

Dickens sitting at his desk writing.

Then rather choose to emulate them, you want to do your own thing? By "interesting" conclusion, I meant "retarded." If you want to travel around with your notebook writing, others who have done the same and been successful at it would have made better examples.
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[User Picture]From: schpydurx
2007-11-02 03:20 pm (UTC)
For the record, the words "interesting" and "retard" don't mean the same thing. Remotely.

But yes, I see that it was an incongruent conclusion. Maybe that's why it didn't make sense when I wrote it.
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[User Picture]From: ehowton
2007-11-02 03:26 pm (UTC)
"Fantastic" and "I want to swallow my own tongue because you keep talking about shit I don't care about and I hate you" don't remotely mean the same thing either. Nonetheless I used them interchangeably in an attempt to feign civility.
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[User Picture]From: schpydurx
2007-11-02 03:31 pm (UTC)
Are you saying that you feel obligated to read my blog?
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[User Picture]From: ehowton
2007-11-02 03:35 pm (UTC)
That statement had nothing whatsoever to do with you. It was an example of personal experience I chose to share.
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[User Picture]From: schpydurx
2007-11-02 03:47 pm (UTC)
You babble horseshit in an attempt to avoid the question, Sir!
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[User Picture]From: ehowton
2007-11-02 03:53 pm (UTC)
On the contrary sir, I will gladly and without prejudice answer your question if you can tell me HOW THE FUCK YOUR DUMB MIND LINKED THE TWO TOGETHER?
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[User Picture]From: schpydurx
2007-11-02 03:56 pm (UTC)
Because I was sitting at my big wooden desk as I was writing as were the people I mentioned. I thought I had included this tidbit in my post, but on persual I see that I did not. My apologies for the confusion.
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[User Picture]From: ehowton
2007-11-02 05:15 pm (UTC)
That is the third time you've alluded to this post being completely nonsensical. I don't know what else to say.
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[User Picture]From: schpydurx
2007-11-02 05:34 pm (UTC)
Maybe I'm not cut out for this writing thing.
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[User Picture]From: fabrizzo
2007-11-03 12:14 am (UTC)
Quitters never win.

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[User Picture]From: schpydurx
2007-11-03 06:06 am (UTC)
Winners never quit.
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[User Picture]From: fabrizzo
2007-11-03 02:01 pm (UTC)
Those who never quit, and never win, are just stupid.
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[User Picture]From: schpydurx
2007-11-03 02:55 pm (UTC)
That's the style, Lou!
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From: irulan_amy
2007-11-03 02:38 am (UTC)
I wish you well in writing. I know how difficult it can be.

You know though - as much technology as I have that will make writing quicker, etc. - I almost always prefer my pen and paper. It just feels more...something. Even though I know I have to go back and type it later.

So you recommend Stephen Kings writing book? I don't read his stuff as I don't like horror (though I would like to check out the Dark Towers series).

My favorite writing book is "Writing Down the Bones" by Natalie Goldberg. Honestly - I need inspiration and I go to it. It is full of practical advice which I haven't found in another writing book.

Not that you were looking for recs, but I thought I would share one anyway.

Did ya have fun closing out the hundreds of support tickets today? ;)
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[User Picture]From: schpydurx
2007-11-03 03:16 pm (UTC)
I wish you well in writing. I know how difficult it can be.
I meant to throw a quote in my post that goes like this: Writing is no harder then ditch-digging. There's a lot of truth in that, but I just saw a quotation on my Google ticker in Gmail that goes like this: Writing is the closest that men ever come to childbearing. There's a truth in that too.

I like doing that too, I'm too lazy to go back and re-type everything. That having been said, I wished that things were at the point so that I can take my pen and write on regular paper and that be instantaneously translated into typed text. I know there have been great strides in this area, but I think there is a long way to go, though I do recall seeing a pen that recorded your strokes when you wrote with it, uploaded that to the computer upon syncing and then converted that to text. What bliss if I could do that on my $2 pens that I'm addicted to!

Yes, I do recommend Stephen King's book, On Writing. I've never read any fiction of his, though I did recently purchase a hard cover of Cell since it was only $9.99. I guarantee that you will laugh and cry your way through On Writing. Similarly, even if you never intend to write screenplays, I highly recommend How Not to Write a Screenplay: 101 Common Mistakes Most Screenwriters Make by Denny Martin Flinn. You will learn so much from the second part of that book, that if it doesn't make your writing tighter, you need to just go ahead and hang up the idea that you're a writer.

I'll definitely check out Writing down the Bones. Thanks for the rec.

Did ya have fun closing out the hundreds of support tickets today?
I didn't close a damned one of them! Closing a ticket is asking for trouble at my job unless your instructed to close one.
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